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The standard Lorem Ipsum passage, used since the 1500s

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"Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum latin text dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum."

Section 1.10.32 of "de Finibus Bonorum et Malorum", written by Cicero in 45 BC

"Sed ut perspiciatis unde omnis iste natus error sit voluptatem accusantium doloremque laudantium, totam rem aperiam, eaque ipsa quae ab illo inventore veritatis et quasi architecto beatae vitae dicta sunt explicabo. Nemo enim ipsam voluptatem quia voluptas sit aspernatur aut odit aut fugit, sed quia consequuntur magni dolores eos qui ratione voluptatem sequi nesciunt. Neque porro quisquam est, qui dolorem ipsum quia dolor sit amet, consectetur, adipisci velit,

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sed quia non numquam eius modi tempora incidunt ut labore et dolore magnam aliquam quaerat voluptatem. Ut enim ad minima veniam, quis nostrum exercitationem ullam corporis suscipit laboriosam, nisi ut aliquid ex ea commodi consequatur? Quis autem vel eum iure reprehenderit qui in ea voluptate velit esse quam nihil molestiae consequatur, vel illum qui dolorem eum fugiat quo voluptas nulla pariatur?"

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hello hello hello hello hello hello hello hello good bye good bye hel

google and you. google and me. google for you and your whole family.

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goodness gracious.

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1914 translation by H. Rackham

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"But I must explain to you how all this mistaken idea of denouncing pleasure and praising pain was born and I will give you a complete account of the system, and expound the actual teachings of the great explorer of the truth, the master-builder of human happiness. No one rejects, dislikes, or avoids pleasure itself, because it is pleasure, but because those who do not know how to pursue pleasure rationally encounter consequences that are extremely painful. Nor again is there anyone who loves or pursues or desires to obtain pain of itself, because it is pain, but because occasionally circumstances occur in which toil and pain can procure him some great pleasure. To take a trivial example, which of us ever undertakes laborious physical exercise, except to obtain some advantage from it? But who has any right to find fault with a man who chooses to enjoy a pleasure that has no annoying consequences, or one who avoids a pain that produces no resultant pleasure?"

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We opened in 1996, selling a unique collection of bespoke pieces. As a Seattle-based boutique we incorporate the culture and style of the city into our mix and attitude. Over the past decade our selection has evolved to become a well-edited assortment of contemporary designers and independent labels from the U.S. and abroad.
 

Sections[edit]

The newspaper is organized in three sections, including the magazine.

  1. News: Includes International, National, Washington, Business, Technology, Science, Health, Sports, The Metro Section, Education, Weather, and Obituaries.
  2. Opinion: Includes EditorialsOp-Eds and Letters to the Editor.
  3. Features: Includes Arts, Movies, Theater, Travel, NYC Guide, Dining & Wine, Home & Garden, Fashion & Style, CrosswordThe New York Times Book ReviewThe New York Times Magazine, and Sunday Review.

Some sections, such as Metro, are only found in the editions of the paper distributed in the New York–New Jersey–Connecticut Tri-State Area and not in the national or Washington, D.C. editions. Aside from a weekly roundup of reprints of editorial cartoons from other newspapers, The New York Times does not have its own staff editorial cartoonist, nor does it feature a comics page or Sunday comicssection. In September 2008, The New York Times announced that it would be combining certain sections effective October 6, 2008, in editions printed in the New York metropolitan area. The changes folded the Metro Section into the main International / National news section and combined Sports and Business (except Saturday through Monday, when Sports is still printed as a standalone section). This change also included having the name of the Metro section be called New York outside of the Tri-State Area. The presses used by The New York Times allow four sections to be printed simultaneously; as the paper had included more than four sections all days except Saturday, the sections had to be printed separately in an early press run and collated together. The changes will allow The New York Times to print in four sections Monday through Wednesday, in addition to Saturday. The New York Times' announcement stated that the number of news pages and employee positions will remain unchanged, with the paper realizing cost savings by cutting overtime expenses.[43] According to Russ Stanton, editor of the Los Angeles Times, a competitor, the newsroom of The New York Times is twice the size of the Los Angeles Times, which currently has a newsroom of 600.[44]

Style[edit]


When referring to people, The New York Times generally uses honorifics, rather than unadorned last names (except in the sports pages, Book Review and Magazine). It stayed with an eight-column format until September 1976, years after other papers had switched to six,[45] and it was one of the last newspapers to adopt color photography, with the first color photograph on the front page appearing on October 16, 1997.[46] In the absence of a major headline, the day's most important story generally appears in the top-right column, on the main page. The typefaces used for the headlines are custom variations of Cheltenham. The running text is set at 8.7 point Imperial.[47]

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Joining a roster of other major American newspapers in the last ten years, including USA TodayThe Wall Street Journal and The Washington PostThe New York Times announced on July 18, 2006, that it would be narrowing the width of its paper by six inches. In an era of dwindling circulation and significant advertising revenue losses for most print versions of American newspapers, the move, which would result in a 5 percent reduction in news coverage, would have a target savings of $12 million a year for the paper.[48] The change from the traditional 54 inches (1.4 m) broadsheet style to a more compact 48-inch web width was addressed by both Executive Editor Bill Keller and The New York Times President Scott Heekin-Canedy in memos to the staff. Keller defended the "more reader-friendly" move indicating that in cutting out the "flabby or redundant prose in longer pieces" the reduction would make for a better paper. Similarly, Keller confronted the challenges of covering news with "less room" by proposing more "rigorous editing" and promised an ongoing commitment to "hard-hitting, ground-breaking journalism".[49] The official change went into effect on August 6, 2007.[50]

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The New York Times printed a display advertisement on its first page on January 6, 2009, breaking tradition at the paper.[51] The advertisement for CBS was in color and was the entire width of the page.[52] The newspaper promised it would place first-page advertisements on only the lower half of the page.[51]

Reputation and awards[edit]

The New York Times has established links regionally with 16 bureaus in the New York region, nationally, with 11 bureaus within the United States, and globally, with 26 foreign news bureaus.[citation needed]

The New York Times has won 112 Pulitzer Prizes, more than any other newspaper. The prize is awarded for excellence in journalism in a range of categories.[53]

Web presence[edit]

The New York Times has had a strong presence on the Web since 1996, and has been ranked one of the top Web sites. Accessing some articles requires registration, though this could be bypassed in some cases through Times RSS feeds.[54] The website had 555 million pageviews in March 2005.[55] The domain nytimes.com attracted at least 146 million visitors annually by 2008 according to aCompete.com study. The New York Times Web site ranks 59th by number of unique visitors, with over 20 million unique visitors in March 2009 making it the most visited newspaper site with more than twice the number of unique visitors as the next most popular site.[56] Also, as of May 2009, nytimes.com produced 22 of the 50 most popular newspaper blogs.[57]

In September 2005, the paper decided to begin subscription-based service for daily columns in a program known as TimesSelect, which encompassed many previously free columns. Until being discontinued two years later, TimesSelect cost $7.95 per month or $49.95 per year,[58] though it was free for print copy subscribers and university students and faculty.[59][60] To avoid this charge, bloggers often reposted TimesSelect material,[61] and at least one site once compiled links of reprinted material.[62] On September 17, 2007, The New York Times announced that it would stop charging for access to parts of its Web site, effective at midnight the following day, reflecting a growing view in the industry that subscription fees cannot outweigh the potential ad revenue from increased traffic on a free site.[63] In addition to opening almost the entire site to all readers, The New York Times news archives from 1987 to the present are available at no charge, as well as those from 1851 to 1922, which are in the public domain.[64][65] Access to the Premium Crosswords section continues to require either home delivery or a subscription for $6.95 per month or $39.95 per year. Times columnists including Nicholas Kristofand Thomas Friedman had criticized TimesSelect,[66][67] with Friedman going so far as to say "I hate it. It pains me enormously because it's cut me off from a lot, a lot of people, especially because I have a lot of people reading me overseas, like in India ... I feel totally cut off from my audience."[68]

The New York Times was made available on the iPhone and iPod Touch in 2008,[69] and on the iPad mobile devices in 2010.[70] It was also the first newspaper to offer a video game as part of its editorial content, Food Import Folly by Persuasive Games.[71] In 2010 reCAPTCHA helped to digitize old editions of The New York Times.[72] In 2012, The New York Times introduced a Chinese-language news site, cn.nytimes.com, with content created by staff based in ShanghaiBeijing and Hong Kong, though the server was placed outside of China to avoid censorship issues.[73]

On October 15, 2012, The News York Times announced that it was adding a Portuguese-language news site next year.[74] In March 2013, The New York Times and National Film Board of Canada announced a partnership entitled A Short History of the Highrise, which will create four short documentaries for the internet about life in highrise buildings as part of the NFB's Highrise project, utilizing images from the newspaper's photo archives for the first three films, and user-submitted images for the final film.[75]

 

Falling print advertising revenue and projections of continued decline resulted in a paywall being instituted in 2011, regarded as modestly successful after garnering several hundred thousand subscriptions and about $100 million in revenue as of March 2012.[76] The paywall was announced on March 17, 2011, that starting on March 28, 2011 (March 17, 2011 for Canada), it would charge frequent readers for access to its online content.[77] Readers would be able to access up to 20 articles each month without charge. (Although beginning in April 2012, the number of free-access articles was halved to just 10 articles per month.) Any reader who wanted to access more would have to pay for a digital subscription. This plan would allow free access for occasional readers, but produce revenue from "heavy" readers. Digital subscriptions rates for four weeks range from $15 to $35 depending on the package selected, with periodic new subscriber promotions offering four-week all-digital access for as low as 99¢. Subscribers to the paper's print edition get full access without any additional fee. Some content, such as the front page and section fronts will remain free, as well as the Top News page on mobile apps.[78] In January, 2013, the Times' public editor Margaret Sullivan announced that for the first time in its history, the paper generated more revenue through subscriptions than through advertising.[79]

Mobile presence[edit]

The Times Reader is a digital version of The New York Times. It was created via a collaboration between the newspaper and MicrosoftTimes Reader takes the principles of print journalism and applies them to the technique of online reporting. Times Reader uses a series of technologies developed by Microsoft and their Windows Presentation Foundation team. It was announced in Seattle in April 2006 byArthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr.Bill Gates, and Tom Bodkin. In 2009 the Times Reader 2.0 was rewritten in Adobe AIR.[80]

In 2008, The New York Times created an app for the iPhone and iPod touch which allowed users to download articles to their mobile device enabling them to read the paper even when they were unable to receive a signal. In April 2010, The New York Times announced it will begin publishing daily content through an iPad app.[81] As of October 2010, The New York Times iPad app is ad-supported and available for free without a paid subscription, but translated into a subscription-based model in 2011.[70]

In 2010, the newspaper also launched an App for Android smartphones.

Moscow[edit]

Communication with its Russian readers is a special project of The New York Times launched in February 2008, guided by Clifford J. Levy. Some Times articles covering the broad spectrum of political and social topics in Russia are being translated into Russian and offered for the attention of Russia's bloggers in The New York Times community blog.[82] After that, selected responses of Russian bloggers are being translated into English and published at The New York Times site among comments from English readers.[83][84]

Reporter resources[edit]

The website's "Newsroom Navigator" collects online resources for use by reporters and editors. It is maintained by Rich Meislin.[85][86][87] Further specific collections are available to cover the subjects of business, politics and health.[85][88][89] In 1998, Meislin was editor-in-chief of electronic media at the newspaper.[90]